Starch & Derivatives Processing Plant

Starch Plant

  • Starch Plant from Corn, Casara, Potato & Rice

Starch can be produced from various starch containing materials like maize, cassava / Tapioca roots, potatoes, wheat, rice etc. There are different technologies for each raw material for recovery of starch. Starch is mostly used for industrial purposes.

Being a pure renewable natural polymer starch has many applications. Its significance as a polysaccharide being able to breakdown into their monomeric and or oligomeric components leading to production of Dextrose, glucose, fructose, maltose & sorbitol. In fact starch has become an important material for the sweetening industry, which was otherwise relying upon sugar cane and beet sugar.

The most common uses of starch are in the following industries:

  • Food industries as glucose, dextrose, fructose, sorbitol, maltodextrin as filler and sweetener
  • Paper industry for sizing, pulp making & surfacing
  • Textile industry for pointing & finishing.
  • Ceramic Industry as binder
  • Adhesive & Abrasive industry as major ingredient.
  • Rubber industry as filler.

Production of Starch from Maize

Starch & Derivaties flow diagram

Derivatives

  • Types of Derivaties (Dextrose, Glucose, Maltose, Maltodextrin, Sorbitol, Starch Plant)

Malto-Dextrine

Maltodextrins are startch hydrolysis products of less than 25 D.E, produced by hydrolysis of Corn starch by enzyme technique. A typical total enzyme process uses Bacterial Alpha Amylase hydrolysis followed by additional conversion to get the desired D.E. They are then refined using clarification, carbon treatment and ion exchange. The final product is spray dried to a moisture level of 3% to 5%.

Dextrose Monohydrate

Dextrose is the trivial name given to crystalline D-Glucose. It is a Monosaccharide sugar and is widely distributed in the plant kingdom. It is largely manufactured by Enzyme-Enzyme hydrolysis of starch; usually corn starch. Dextrose is available in the Monohydrate and Anhydrous form.

Liquid Glucose

Commonly known as Glucose or corn Syrup, this is perhaps the most visible substitute of cane sugar. Liquid Glucose is an aqueous solution of several compounds. These are principally Dextrose, Dextrins and Maltose. The most common method of manufacturing Liquid Glucose is by the incompleted acidic or enzymatic hydrolysis of starch folllowed by refining (filtration and ion exchange)& evaporation.

Production of Starch Derivatives

Starch & Derivaties flow diagram

Celebrating 40 Years